2 or 4 stroke? (newbie here obviously)

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jml
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Re: 2 or 4 stroke? (newbie here obviously)

Postby jml » Sat Apr 04, 2015 6:18 pm

Ockerstrom wrote:My DR650 is set up with a 30 litre fuel tank, luggage, and a lot of other upgrades... and it is far more capable and easier to ride than my R1150GS was.


I always felt like those beamers would be a handful off road with a full set of panniers on them. They have made them so good looking it almost makes you feel bad for beating on them.

Ockerstrom wrote:I figure I will probably just ride at my own pace on whatever tracks/trials courses I can get access to for about six months, hopefully I will find some riding mates who are prepared to give me some "personal training" to help me gain some skills.


Check out this post I made a few weeks ago, has a bunch of recommended DVDs and books in it: viewtopic.php?f=20&t=9632#p34843

Check these resources out DVD and YouTube as they provide some solid riding techniques.



Ockerstrom
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Re: 2 or 4 stroke? (newbie here obviously)

Postby Ockerstrom » Sun Apr 05, 2015 9:57 am

jml wrote:
Check out this post I made a few weeks ago, has a bunch of recommended DVDs and books in it: viewtopic.php?f=20&t=9632#p34843

Check these resources out DVD and YouTube as they provide some solid riding techniques.


Had a quick look, will need more time to watch them than I have free this weekend. :roll:

Thanks,

Any opinions on the Yamaha TY range (175/250) ?

Old trials bikes that would let me compete at the easier level of Observed Trials if what I've been told is correct.



jml
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Re: 2 or 4 stroke? (newbie here obviously)

Postby jml » Sun Apr 05, 2015 5:09 pm

Ockerstrom wrote:Old trials bikes that would let me compete at the easier level of Observed Trials if what I've been told is correct.


Not quite the full truth. An older trials bike will only limit your ability to ride in higher grades. A modern trials bike can run in all the grades that an older bike can expect when the event is limited to only older twin shocks but these events are few and far between as there are a lot more mixed bike (old + new) events than classic/old only events. A modern trials bike can run in the grades: Intro*, Clubman, C, C+*, B, A (and anything else higher) . I believe some clubs will limit a twinshock from anything higher than Clubman or C (someone correct me here). With a modern bike you have no limits on what grade you select and there is no pressure to have to ride in elite grades just because you're on modern machinery. So in essence a modern trials bike in a grade like Clubman or Intro (if it's on offer) would be a great introduction to the sport.

Something that I learnt early on was to not attempt anything you don't feel 100% comfortable with and no one there will force you to do otherwise. It's better to fight another day than be out for weeks with an injury. If you don't feel like doing the hazard you can avoid it (if possible) or take a 5 pointer for that section. Later on after the event I'd recommend finding an obstacle similar but smaller and attempt it, or incorporate that into your next training session. Then once you feel comfortable comeback at a later day and attempt that hazard/obstacle in your own time.

Here are some sample sections of the clubman grade from WDTC (QLD) trials club, some of these examples are on the harder side but give you an idea of the hazards that a Clubman will face: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LW7vph9sR08

* not all clubs have these lines

Another great tip would be to get yourself down to a local event as it's the best way to see what it's all about :mrgreen:



Ockerstrom
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Re: 2 or 4 stroke? (newbie here obviously)

Postby Ockerstrom » Sun Apr 05, 2015 9:46 pm

Ahhhhhhh!

Ok, seems I've been given some misguided (perhaps obsolete) information on the different comp levels.

Easy stuff is where I want to start.

And I've never been one to be lured by peer pressure or the "I dare ya" comments of numb-bats :lol:

I like to keep working progressively to improve my skills... with anything I do.

The feedback is great jml, thank you.

I really do need to get on a bike or two to try, and source something to buy.

Now I well expand the range of what I consider though.... a $4k to $5k budget might almost be achievable, so that should let me find something reasonable I think.



jml
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Re: 2 or 4 stroke? (newbie here obviously)

Postby jml » Sun Apr 05, 2015 10:26 pm

Ockerstrom wrote:Easy stuff is where I want to start.

I like to keep working progressively to improve my skills... with anything I do.

The feedback is great jml, thank you.

I really do need to get on a bike or two to try, and source something to buy.

Now I well expand the range of what I consider though.... a $4k to $5k budget might almost be achievable, so that should let me find something reasonable I think.


No problems at all :mrgreen:

Definately bringing that mentality to trials will be helpful as it strongly relies on building on those base skills before progressing. Starting from scratch with easy stuff is a great way to learn the craft without being thrown into the deep end. From my point of view there is a very large jump between Clubman and C-grade, where C-grade heavily relies on mastery of Clubman skills and adds more vertical challenges and having to navigate gates. Clubman riders are free to select their own line inside the boundaries of the section so you don't get bogged down with having to so much remember the course, but just ride and get use to the bike and the smaller hazards that are long your selected line. In saying that it's definitely not impossible to jump straight to C-grade, but for myself I don't feel like I have the toolkit of skills at the moment to really enjoy the riding without a lot of tyre spinning, dabbing and bouncing off of rocks thus I'll stay in clubman for as long as it takes to get those skills.

$4-5k was my budget and I ended up finding a bike for $4.1k (including freight from QLD->NSW) and spending around another 500-600 on gear. Just remember to factor in a few extras like Trials gloves, open face helmet, trials boots and a lanyard kill switch (if the bike isn't fitted with one). These are some of the things that just make life easier for a new riders as having the wrong gear can sometimes adversely affect your riding experience and ability to improve (for instance: MX boots give little feel, flexibility and have absolutely no grip on slippy rocks) so make sure you leave a little wiggle room on the budget to grab these essentials.

In regards to jumping on a bike I'd definately reiterate the http://www.trialsacademy.com.au/ whos next course is in 20 days at Pacific Park (South Maroota). It's 4-5 hours of riding which gives you a gentle splash into the sport by some of the best riders in this area. You start with a series of drills which take you through the core skills of the sport, then out into the forest for some basic "putting it all together". Was an awesome day the only thing that was a let down was my fitness! #-o Obviously there is a price involved but it's going to give you the longest amount of time to get a feel for the trials bike itself, much longer than a 5-min test ride of a bike before deciding if it's really for you. Best $350, it's such a shame that other sports don't have a similar "experience" to know if your really going to enjoy the sport. =D>



David Lahey
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Re: 2 or 4 stroke? (newbie here obviously)

Postby David Lahey » Mon Apr 06, 2015 10:39 am

jml wrote:
Ockerstrom wrote:Old trials bikes that would let me compete at the easier level of Observed Trials if what I've been told is correct.

A modern trials bike can run in the grades: Intro*, Clubman, C, C+*, B, A (and anything else higher) . I believe some clubs will limit a twinshock from anything higher than Clubman or C (someone correct me here).

Never heard that rule before. Maybe you are thinking of which lines are usually used for Twinshock class which is different to which classes you are allowed to ride a Twinshock bike in


relax, nothing is under control

jml
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Re: 2 or 4 stroke? (newbie here obviously)

Postby jml » Mon Apr 06, 2015 12:16 pm

David Lahey wrote:
jml wrote:
Ockerstrom wrote:Old trials bikes that would let me compete at the easier level of Observed Trials if what I've been told is correct.

A modern trials bike can run in the grades: Intro*, Clubman, C, C+*, B, A (and anything else higher) . I believe some clubs will limit a twinshock from anything higher than Clubman or C (someone correct me here).

Never heard that rule before. Maybe you are thinking of which lines are usually used for Twinshock class which is different to which classes you are allowed to ride a Twinshock bike in


Okay I found the source of Information I got that from and I've kind of misinterpreted it. Here is the source:

Classic classes exist for vintage bikes built before 1965. There's a twin-shock class for trials bikes built before about 1985. The mono shock trials bikes are around 1985 and on - these have become lighter and more capable every year. There are classes for the different bikes at all competitions.

Generally classic and twin-shock bikes will only do Intro sections in a competition, the easiest grade - see this video for examples of the Intro grade. However, experienced riders often ride Clubman sections or even C grade on twin-shock bikes - see one of our club members doing his thing on an old twin shock here.


From: http://www.wdtc.org.au/sub-pages/buying ... s-bike.htm

This link also help with answering some of the questions about 2T or 4T =D> But David is correct in that this is not a hard or fast rule, but more an observation that someone has made about the riders on classic bikes.




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