Road reg trials bikes

Want to say something about trials? Let the world know in here!

Moderator: Moderators

surferbrown
Junior participant
Junior participant
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2012 8:32 pm
Bike: Ty 175

Re: Road reg trials bikes

Postby surferbrown » Wed Feb 04, 2015 7:31 pm

Any more news on the randonne and it's compliance for rego ?



User avatar
The Hell Team
Dealer
Dealer
Posts: 343
Joined: Sat Oct 25, 2003 11:31 am
Location: Between Hell and High Water.....

Re: Road reg trials bikes

Postby The Hell Team » Thu Feb 05, 2015 8:07 am

Not yet, still working on it.


We can crate and freight bikes Australia wide for very reasonable rates. Ring or email with your location for freight quote.
The Hell Team Trials Store
02.8424.6400
0418.415.129
whoever@thehellteam.com
http://www.thehellteam.com

skippy
Junior participant
Junior participant
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Oct 21, 2012 2:13 pm

Re: Road reg trials bikes

Postby skippy » Tue Mar 03, 2015 1:31 pm

Just received this from Sherco, re the X-Ride:

"Apologies for the delayed response. This model is available (on order basis only) and will be sold without ADR approval."


skippy

surferbrown
Junior participant
Junior participant
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Jul 11, 2012 8:32 pm
Bike: Ty 175

Re: Road reg trials bikes

Postby surferbrown » Sun Apr 12, 2015 8:10 pm

So what's the news on randonne for rego been a long time since testing stated ?



Jon V8
Expert participant
Expert participant
Posts: 209
Joined: Tue Dec 28, 2010 10:44 pm
Bike: Ty250,Ht5.
Club: Bath Classic
Location: Near Bath,SW UK.

Re: Road reg trials bikes

Postby Jon V8 » Mon Apr 13, 2015 5:06 am

As an interested outsider from the UK,can someone explain how the Aussie compliance thing works please.



User avatar
whitehillbilly
A grade participant
A grade participant
Posts: 169
Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2012 6:14 am
Bike: Greeves/ 95 Fantic S
Club: SQTA

Re: Road reg trials bikes

Postby whitehillbilly » Mon Apr 13, 2015 8:56 am

I find it incredible that I can Road Register my old 1960 Greeves Scottish, with no problems.
Just a frame and engine number. Bulb horn, no indicators, and a head light, trail and brake light run off a 7.2v Makita cordless drill battery in the tool box, when needed.
Yet. a 1977 Honda CJ250T, with all the 'modern gear', need to be engineer certified, and a compliance plate added, because it was two months over the cut off date.
It changed mid 77 sometime.
The Honda was stock standard. No frame chop, no motor upsize.
The 'Inspection' was done via information and photos, I sent them.

whitehillbilly



pop
Expert participant
Expert participant
Posts: 223
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2011 11:40 am
Bike: klx

Re: Road reg trials bikes

Postby pop » Sun Apr 19, 2015 7:45 pm

Jon V8 wrote:As an interested outsider from the UK,can someone explain how the Aussie compliance thing works please.

I don't think anyone can, the closest would be "jobs for the boys". People who seem to think they know more about bikes or cars then eg BMW, Mercedes, Honda etc.



Ockerstrom
Junior participant
Junior participant
Posts: 13
Joined: Fri Apr 03, 2015 1:04 am

Re: Road reg trials bikes

Postby Ockerstrom » Sun Apr 19, 2015 8:14 pm

Jon V8 wrote:As an interested outsider from the UK,can someone explain how the Aussie compliance thing works please.


Our authorities responsible for registering vehicles here in Australia think they know more about what is required in the way of road safety and engine emission control than the rest of all the other first world countries put together.... subsequently they make up their own rules for us to comply with.

Then all the vehicles that are produced for import to Australia must be specifically built to meet our compliance laws, at a cost of millions to the manufacturing companies (that cost then gets passed on to us, the consumer).

We can also bring in second hand vehicles from overseas, we call them "grey imports", they then have to be "complianced" by authorised mechanical workshops.
Basically it involves replacing all fluids in the vehicle, and tyres, with over the counter products available here in Australia, the rest of the emission differences seem to be ignored for compliancing "grey imports".

Now I'm sure someone will come along and tear my view of it to pieces with real facts on what actually gets done for both new and second hand vehicles to meet Australian Compliance standards, but having owned both imports and grey imports, that is my view of what I've encountered.

It seems much of the bureaucratic process is designed to create jobs for bureaucrats, and fill government coffers.... particularly given that much of the rest of the world have higher safety and emission standards than we do.



David Lahey
Champion
Champion
Posts: 3397
Joined: Thu Jun 05, 2003 7:01 pm
Bike: Many Twinshocks
Club: CQTC Inc, RTC Inc
Location: Gladstone, Queensland

Re: Road reg trials bikes

Postby David Lahey » Sun Apr 19, 2015 9:22 pm

at the time of the introduction of the ADRs, there were no international standards for car and motorbike safety features and many new vehicles (but not mercedes, volvo etc) were woeful in that regard, so we got ADRs for things like seat belts, windscreens, crumple zones and side anti-intrusion bars.
Emissions standards for Aussie cars also came under the ADRs so we got sealed fuel systems, exhaust gas recirculation and even air compressors on some cars, starting in 1976. By 1986 we joined most of the developed world and new cars in Australia were made for unleaded petrol and ran catalytic converters. Some new cars even then still had terrible crash performance.
The ADRs came to cause havoc for new, road registered motorbikes when they were introduced in 1976. The main change for us was that new bikes had to be a lot quieter, which brought about a lot of dirt bikes needing new sprockets and exhaust mods before they went well (XR600 springs to mind here). Many even had orifice plates fitted between carby and inlet or at the exhaust port outlet to achieve the noise targets. Some enduro bikes from Europe that were developed to meet strict European noise standards went great and met the ADRs even with everything standard (Montesas and Bultacos), but the existing designs of Japanese two stroke enduro bikes were a mile off being quiet enough. This was when the Japanese started making us think that 4 strokes were a good idea (TT250 1979, TT500 XT500 1975, XRs 1979). It was good for them because it was easier to meet the ADRs with a 4 stroke. It took quite a while for the Japanese to bring out bikes that went well and also met the ADRs off the showroom floor (an early exception was the (1977) TY175JC). Some Japanese models never really did achieve this in their model life (KDX, IT, PE). I remember my new (1977 model) IT175D was like a screaming banshee. It had no battery or indicators and the ADR plate was posted out to me months after buying the bike.
Jeez I'm rabbiting on. Yes we stopped needing ADRs on motorbikes decades ago now and should adopt some relevant international standards instead (just not the Californian standards)


relax, nothing is under control

Jon V8
Expert participant
Expert participant
Posts: 209
Joined: Tue Dec 28, 2010 10:44 pm
Bike: Ty250,Ht5.
Club: Bath Classic
Location: Near Bath,SW UK.

Re: Road reg trials bikes

Postby Jon V8 » Tue Apr 21, 2015 7:00 am

Thanks for the replies,sounds like any typical govt department... Keeping it all going around in circles to justify their own existence.My brother had a very frustrating time recently trying to register a boat trailer in WA that came from South Australia, and I thought the UK / Europe were leaders in red tape !




Return to “Trials Talk”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests